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Наставлене по строительству оборонительных сооруже
Образец подбрустверного укрытия из бетона
Образец подбрустверного укрытия из бетона.
Из наставленя по строительству оборонительных сооружений для немецких войск. Издание июнь 1916. 

Случайная фотография из Галереи:

Сморгонь: перед парадом
Сморгонь: бивак в городском парке
Военно-историческая реконструкция ПМВ в Сморгони 10 сентября 2011, парад участников и бивак в городском парке. Фото: В. Тадра

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Лакокрасочные материалы клей пва лкм продажа клея пва. .
Fortification Glossary Print E-mail

 

The main purpose of this glossary is to provide some basic information related to fortifications terminology used in Soviet fortification. At this moment there is no such glossary available (at least we do not know about it) and this is because we make an attempt to develop it. The main idea is to introduce some commons terms specific to Soviet fortifications. All of these terms are widely used on our website as well on other sources. We also provide some abbreviations for terms in “transcriptional” form (it is transcription from Russians abbreviations, these abbreviations widely used in Russian fortification literature).

 
  • Fortified Region (alternative Fortified Area, Russian abbr. transcription: UR) – some selected area prepared in special way with permanent and field fortifications as well with artificial obstacles considered for strong and long term defense with special troops only or in cooperation with regular army forces. Main purpose is to protect strategically important directions and areas. Before WWII was common practice for USSR to build fortified regions along state border line. Can be from 30 till 50 km in length and few km in depth. Usually URs was named with some name of location it was built e.g. Minsk UR, Polotsk UR, but in additional it can be assigned with some numeric value e.g. UR No. 62 (alternative name for Brest UR).
  • Battalion Defense Region (Russian abbr. transcription: BRO)  - In context of Fortified Regions built before 1939 means selected zone of some UR, intended to be occupied by special Machine Gun & Artillery Battalion. It can be considered as structural part of UR. Adjacent BROs must have fire support of each other. Area for BRO considered from 1 km x 1 km (for primary sectors) up to 3 km x 3 km (for secondary sectors). Depth of BRO: 1-1.5km. Number of all bunkers: 20-25. The base type of bunker used in BRO: front fire MG bunker. Usually BRO named with numeric index like BRO “VI” (or BRO “6”) or with literal index BRO “A”,BRO “B” etc.
  • Company Defense Region (Russian transcription: RRO) - In context of Fortified Regions built before 1939 means selected zone of some UR, intended to be occupied by one Company (company of special Machine Gun & Artillery Battalion). More small in size and number of bunkers in comparison to BRO. Can be treated as part of some BRO (usually BRO consists of 3 RROs). But in some cases RRO was considered as separate UR zone not related to any BRO. Number of bunkers: 8-10. In case of standalone RRO (not related to any BRO) usually named with numeric index like RRO “IV” (or RRO “4”) or with literal index RRO “C” etc.
  • Center of Resistance (Russian abbr. transcription: UO) – In context of Fortified Regions built after 1939 means selected area of UR intended to be occupied by special Machine Gun & Artillery Battalion. It can be considered as structural part of UR. (It is analogue of BRO for UR built before 1939). The key difference from BRO: BRO was designed to provide front fire defense but UO was developed to be able provide standalone circular defense. This because the main type of bunkers used in UO were artillery and MG flank fire bunkers. Usually UO was identified by numeric index: UO 13 of Brest UR.
  • Strong Point (Russian abbr. transcription: OP) – in context of Fortified Regions built after 1939 (actually first OPs was built in 1938-1939 during program of modernization URs built before 1939 but building works  was not finished) means selected zone of some UR, intended to be occupied by special troops of Machine Gun & Artillery Battalion. More small in size and number of bunkers in comparison to UO. Can be treated as part of some UO. But in some cases OP was considered as separate UR zone not related to any UO. Was developed to provide circular defense. In case OP was part of some UO it usually assigned with numeric index like OP 2 of UO 13 of Brest UR. In case of standalone OP (not related to any UO) usually named by name of location it was placed OP “Mogilno”.
  • Bunker – common term to identify of permanent fortification constructions of any type (MG, artillery, front or flank fire)
  • Pillbox – common term to identify MG bunkers. For Soviet fortification it usually means front fire bunker.
  • DOT  – transcription of Russian abbreviation to identify: 1 – analogue of “bunker” to identify any fortification construction in general. 2 – analog of “pillbox” to identify front fire MG bunker. The most popular term for Soviet fortifications.
  • DOS  – transcription of Russian abbreviation to identify any fortification construction in general. 
  • Caponier – common term to identify flank fire bunkers both for MG and artillery. Caponier provides fire in two opposite directions.
  • Half – caponier – common term to identify flank fire bunkers both for MG and artillery. HC provides fire only in one direction in comparison to Caponier.
  • KNP - transcription of Russian abbreviation to identify command and observation bunker: bunker for Commander of BRO or RRO. Can be also used like usual front fire MG bunker. Usually this bunker was developed in special way in comparison to standard MG bunker: it often has two floors and supplied with additional equipment.
  • ANP - transcription of Russian abbreviation to identify artillery observation bunker for artillery officer. Was designed in special way (special types of embrasures were used). It also can be used to provide MG front fire.
  • OK - transcription of Russian abbreviation to identify artillery caponier. Fitted out with 4 x 76mm artillery guns.
  • OPK  – transcription of Russian abbreviation to identify artillery half caponier fitted out with 2 x 76mm or fitted out with 2 x L-17 artillery systems.
  • OPDOT - transcription of Russian abbreviation to identify front fire artillery and MG bunker fitted out with one (in some cases two) artillery system DOT-4 45mm and one (or two) MGs “Maxim”.
  • PDOT – transcription of Russian abbreviation to identify front fire MG bunker.
  • ODOT – transcription of Russian abbreviation to identify front fire artillery bunker. Fitted out with 1-3 artillery systems 45mm DOT-4.
  • OPPK - transcription of Russian abbreviation to identify half caponier fitted out with one (in some cases two) artillery system DOT-4 45mm and one (or more) MGs “Maxim”.
  • OPK - transcription of Russian abbreviation to identify caponier fitted out with two artillery systems DOT-4 45mm and two MGs “Maxim”.
  • PPK - transcription of Russian abbreviation to identify flank fire half caponier fitted with MGs.

 

It is not final and complete version of glossary. Fill free to post your questions, comments, additions and proposals.

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